Support the campaign

email iconAdvocacy helps bring about change in public attitudes and policies that affect our lives. No matter who you are, you can advocate for change. You truly can make a difference — just like the individuals and groups standing with us throughout Massachusetts and across the nation — so please contact us. Someone from our team will be in touch with you promptly.

You may be:

  • A parent or sibling whose family bears the scars of addiction,
  • A former drug user grateful for the opportunity you were given to receive court-ordered treatment instead of jail,
  • A teacher who sees the undeniable signs of drug use in a student,
  • A victim of a drugged-driving accident,
  • An employer striving to maintain a drug-free workplace.

Every effort is valuable, and here are some ways you can make a positive difference for Massachusetts families and communities:

  • Educate yourself on this issue. Check this site frequently for updates, and encourage others to do the same.
  • Talk with family and friends. We continually find that people are under-educated about marijuana’s harmfulness to public health and safety. Speak up about it.
  • Reach out to your larger networks. If you’re a member of a civic, public-service, community or faith-based group, ask if you could provide educational materials to other members or give a brief presentation about what you know (our team will be happy to present if you make the connection).
  • Contact local media. Write a letter to the editor, or submit an opinion piece. Leave a comment on a story posted online. Call a reporter and ask for accurate, fair and thoughtful news coverage about this issue. Call talk-radio stations discussing this issue.
  • Contact your elected officials. Educating your elected officials is the first step toward finding real solutions and creating or amending laws that will reduce illegal drug use, drug addiction and drug-related accidents and deaths. Visit SaveOurSociety.org to find your elected officials.
  • Volunteer at and/or support your local drug-prevention coalition.