The harms of indoor marijuana grows

The harms of indoor marijuana grows

Research findings presented this week in Denver underscore that marijuana users often have no idea what they’re really smoking and that their so-called “medicine” is often grown in mold-infested homes, offices and warehouses.

As DrThurstone.com explains, it doesn’t matter if we’re talking tomatoes or snap peas. It is a terrible idea to cultivate any plants in the manner and density that researchers observed while testing 30 indoor marijuana grow operations in Colorado. But let’s face it: there aren’t many people growing veggies in their basements and/or attics.

Of the operations examined, 20 had a “medical marijuana component,” and at least two supplied marijuana dispensaries, Colorado authorities said. Mold and spore levels in the indoor operations were so high that they exceeded levels captured by diagnostic equipment, said John Martyny of National Jewish and an associate professor at the University of Colorado, who led the research study. You can read his team’s full report here.

For more than a decade, Martyny has examined the environmental impact of illicit substance production — particularly methamphetamine (meth labs) and marijuana — to help first responders and law enforcement officers charged with investigating such operations understand how to equip and protect themselves in those environments. As he explained this week, unsuspecting neighbors and office workers are also at risk of serious health hazards.